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Date/Report Number …..031211.LC-HYJY22 Item: WWII 1938 U-38 WYLER MILITARY WRIST WATCH
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Description of item:  WWII 1938 U-38 WYLER MILITARY WRIST WATCH 29 x 34 CUSTOM DESIGNED FOR GERMAN CLIENT WITH SUB-SECONDS REGISTER SUPER WATER PROOF SINGLE CASE DESIGN  WITH BROWN LEATHER BUND STYLE MILITARY STRAP.    DIAL OFF-WHITE FINISHED DIAL 12 3 9 BLACK OUTLINED LUMED NUMERALS COLOR RELECTING SILVER METAL CHAPTER RING LUMED RECTANGULAR MARKERS WITH OUTER BLACK SECONDS CHAPTER RING HOUR AND MINUTE HANDS SILVER WITH LUME AND SUB-SECONDS REGISTER MARKER EVERY 15 SECONDS WITH STEEL SECOND HAND AND 13 THROUGH 24 HOUR MILITARY TIME.LUME IS NEW AND THERE IT HAS A LARGE CROWN. MOVEMENT & DIAL FIT INTO FRONT OF CASE STEM IS TWO-PIECE AND SNAPS INTO CASE CRYSTAL WITH INTERNAL PRESSURE RING IS PRESSED OVER THE DIAL SEALING THE MOVEMENT INTERNAL RING AND CRYSTAL FORM THE SEAL. ONE PIECECASE IS INEXCELLENT CONDITION IT HAS A FALSE COVER TRENCH ART SIGNED  1938 U 38 "PITCHFORK" HANS ON COVER BACK AND SOLID CASE BACK.BUND LEATHER WATCH STRAP WITH CHROME PLATED RIVITS AND BUCKLE 9 INCHESFITS UP TO 8.5 INCH WRIST. MOVEMENT IS AS 984 1938  SIGNED WYLER WATCH CO. FIFTEEN JEWELS ADJUSTED ADJUSTED ONE POSITION SWISS.  Features manual wind sub second Data 10.5''', Dm= 23.3mm H= 3.8mm 15/17 jewels f = 18000 A/h power reserve 40h. CONDITION IS MINT.

Estimated Retail Replacement Value $3489.00


Reports are supplied at the request of the customer and it is for the customer's exclusive use. Reports express an opinion of the time of the examination of the jewelry. This report is for customers use only for the following two purposes, indicating estimated retail replacement value to obtain insurance coverage, or for the purpose of providing geological information. goldsmith Works does not guarantee that the appraisal valuation will result in a sale at the price. Estimated retail replacement value is arrived after analyses of what the approximate high retail cash asking price is for labor, materials, and design. These prices may be substantially higher than actual transaction or warranty with regards to any item described in the report, since jewelry grading is not an exact science, this  report represent the best opinion of the company. GoldSmith Works is in no case responsible for differences that occur by repeated grading by other experts in the field and/or use of other standards, norms, methods or criteria other than those used by GoldSmith Works. GoldSmith Works is expressly held harmless by customers including, but with out limitation for any claims or actions that may arise out of negligence in connection with the preparation of this laboratory report, or actions based upon the customer's use of the report. The information on the carat weight, clarity grade, color grade on the report is approximate due to the limitations in jewelry grading. The item was tested, graded, and examined under 10x magnification using the techniques and equipment available to GoldSmith Works, including fully corrected triplet loupe, binocular microscope, master color comparison guides, diamond color comparison tools, electronic carat balance, non-contact optical measuring device, and ancillary instruments necessary at the time of Exam

 

 


 

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U-37 IDENTICAL TO U-38
German submarine U-38 (1938)
Career (Nazi Germany)    
Name:     U-38
Ordered:     July 29, 1936
Builder:     AG Weser, Bremen
Yard number:     943
Laid down:     April 15, 1937
Launched:     August 9, 1938
Commissioned:     October 24, 1938]
Fate:     Scuttled May 5, 1945 west of Wesermnde and later broken up in 1948.
General characteristics
Type:     Type IXA submarine
Displacement:     1,032 t (1,016 long tons) surfaced
1,152 t (1,134 long tons) submerged
Length:     76.6 m (251 ft 4 in) o/a
58.7 m (192 ft 7 in) pressure hull
Beam:     6.5 m (21 ft 4 in) o/a
4.4 m (14 ft 5 in) pressure hull
Height:     9.4 m (30 ft 10 in)
Draft:     4.7 m (15 ft 5 in)
Propulsion:     2 MAN M9V40/46 supercharged 9-cylinder diesel engines, 4,400 hp (3,281 kW)
2 SSW GU345/34 double-acting electric motors, 1,000 hp (746 kW)
Speed:     18.2 knots (33.7 km/h) surfaced
7.7 knots (14.3 km/h) submerged
Range:     19,425 nmi (35,975 km) at 10 knots (19 km/h) surfaced
144 nmi (267 km) at 4 kn (7.4 km/h) submerged
Test depth:     230 m (750 ft)
Complement:     48 to 56
Armament:     • 6 torpedo tubes (4 bow, 2 stern)
• 22 533 mm (21 in) torpedoes
• 1 Utof 105 mm/45 deck gun (110 rounds)
• AA guns (2 cm FlaK 30)
Service record
Part of:     Kriegsmarine:
6. Unterseebootsflottille
(24 October 1938-31 December 1939)
2. Unterseebootsflottille
(1 January 1940-30 November 1941)
24. Unterseebootsflottille<br(1 December 1941-31 March 1942)
21. Unterseebootsflottille
(1 April 1942-30 November 1943)
4. Unterseebootsflottille
(1 December 1943-28 February 1945)
5. Unterseebootsflottille
(1 March 1945-5 May 1945)
Identification codes:     M 20 675
Commanders:     Heinrich Liebe
Heinrich Schuch
Ludo Kregelin
Helmut Laubert
Paul Sander
Goske von Mllendorff
Herbert Khn
Georg Peters[2]
Operations:     11[1][2]
Victories:     35 ships sunk for a total of 188,967 gross register tons (GRT)
1 ship damaged for a total of 3,670 GRT[5]

German submarine U-38 was a Type IXA U-boat of the German Kriegsmarine that operated during World War II. Her keel was laid down on 15 April 1937, by AG Weser of Bremen. She was commissioned 24 October 1938 with Kapitnleutnant Heinrich Liebe in command. U-38 conducted eleven patrols, as part of several flotillas. During her career, U-38 managed to sink over 30 enemy vessels and damaged a further one. U-38 ranks as one of the most successful U-boats in World War II. On 5 May 1945, U-38 was scuttled west of Wesermnde. Throughout the war, U-38 suffered no losses among her crew.

1st Patrol

U-38 left the port of Wilhelmshaven, with Kapitnleutnant Heinrich Liebe in command, on 19 August 1939. The ship operated off the coast of Lisbon, prior to returning to port on 18 September 1939. During this four week long patrol, U-38 sank two ships.

On 5 September 1939 U-38 stopped the French ship Pluvoise and examined her papers and released her. Pluvoise broadcast the event, which would warn others of the U-boat. Liebe was reprimanded.

The British steam freighter SS Manaar was sunk on 6 September 1939. U-38 opened fire on the freighter and fire was returned. This was the first time that a merchantman fired at a U-boat. U-38 sank the Manaar with torpedoes. As Manaar had fired at him, Liebe did not assist survivors. Radio Officer James Turner remained at his post until the last moment. As he was leaving he found two Lascars, one badly injured. Turner rescued both men while under continuous fire from U-38, for this he was awarded the Empire Gallantry Medal

On 11 September 1939, while flying the Irish tricolour, the Inverliffey was shelled and sunk. In spite of Captain William Trowsdale's protestation that they were Irish, Liebe said that they "were sorry" but they would sink Inverliffey as she was carrying petrol, which was contraband to England. The crew took to the lifeboats. Inverliffey burned fiercely, endangering the lifeboats. At risk to herself, U-38 approached and threw lines to the lifeboats and towed them to safety As Captain Trowsdale's lifeboat was damaged, they were allowed to board the U-boat. The captain did not have a lifebelt, so he was given one. U-38 stopped the American tanker R.G. Stewart and put Inverliffey's crew on board. Just two days earlier, Inver tankers transferred its ships from the Irish to the British registry

 


2nd Patrol

After nearly two months ashore, U-38 again left Wilhelmshaven, with Heinrich Liebe in command, on 12 November 1939. This second patrol of the boat was to operate off the waters northwest of Norway.

On 17 November 1939, Naval High Command (SKL) issued secret orders for U-38 and U-36 to scout the location for Basis Nord, a secret German naval base to be used for raids on allied shipping located off of the Kola Peninsula, provided by the Soviet Union that month.[14] The mission required coded messages to be flashed to Soviet naval vessels patrolling the area preceding a Soviet escort to the prospective base location.

U-36 never made it out of the Norwegian Sea and was sunk by the British submarine HMS Salmon. U-38 rounded North Cape uneventfully and arrived in Teriberka Bay by mid-afternoon on 26 November. Running silently into the bay, U-38 had to avoid being spotted by merchant vessels in order to help maintain the Soviet Union's attempted appearance of neutrality at that time. U-38's captain commented that, while in the area of the North Cape and the Kola Peninsula, he had observed thirty to forty targets and regrettably had been "harmless to [all] of them."

After completing the clandestine reconnaissance mission, U-38 returned to raiding duties and sank three ships, two British and one Greek. The British steam freighter SS Thomas Walton was sunk on 7 December. The Greek steam freighter SS Garoufalia was sunk on 11 December, and the British steam freighter SS Deptford was sunk on 13 December. After an operation period of four and one half weeks, U-38 returned to port in Wilhelmshaven on 16 December.

3rd Patroll

Once again, U-38 would spend considerable time ashore, prior to leaving port on 26 February 1940, again with Heinrich Liebe in command, for operations in the Western Approaches.

During this patrol, U-38 sank six ships. First sunk was the neutral Irish steam trawler ST Leukos on 9 March, with a single shell at point-blank rang, off Tory Island, all 11 crew were lost. The Leukos was fishing in the company of British trawlers. It has been speculated that she positioned herself between the surfacing U-boat and the fleeing British in the belief that her neutral markings would protect her. Followed by the sinking of the Danish motor freighters SS Argentina on 17 March and the SS Algier and SS Christiansborg on 21 March. The Norwegian motor freighter MV Cometa was sunk on 26 March. The sixth and final ship sunk during this third patrol was the Finnish steam freighter SS Signe on 2 April. After nearly six weeks on the high seas, U-38 returned home again to Wilhelmshaven on 5 April 1940.


4th Patrol

Again, U-38 would leave its home port of Wilhelmshaven with Heinrich Liebe in command. U-38 departed port on 8 April 1940. U-38 would patrol the waters off of Norway, supporting the occupation of Norway by Nazi troops. During this patrol, U-38 reported problems with its torpedoes, as the HMS Effingham was fired upon with no damage taken. U-38 would return to port on 27 April 1940.

There were two naval battles of Narvik on 10 April 1940 and 13 April 1940. U-38 and U-65 were positioned at the entrance of the fjord. When the Royal Navy arrived, U-38 fired at HMS Valiant and at HMS Southampton missing both. In the second battle, U-38 fired at HMS Effingham, but the torpedoes pre-matured (exploded before reaching their target).

th Patrol

For her fifth patrol, U-38 would again depart from Wilhelmshaven with Heinrich Liebe in command on June 6. U-38 was to patrol the waters off southern Ireland. During this patrol, Liebe would hit six ships, two of which were sailing in convoy at the time. On June 14, U-38 sank the Greek steam freighter SS Mount Myrto. The next day, U-38 sank two ships, both sailing as part of the HX-47 convoy, sailing from Halifax to England. First sunk was the Canadian steam freighter SS Erik Boye, followed by the Norwegian motor tanker MV Italia. Five days later, June 20, the Swedish steam freighter SS Tilia Gorthon was torpedoed and sunk. The Belgian steam freighter SS Luxembourg was sunk on June 21, followed by the Greek steam freighter SS Neion on the following day. After three weeks at sea, U-38 returned to Wilhelmshaven on July 2, 1940.


During this patrol, U-38 was able to land Walter Simon, a Nazi agent, at Dingle Bay in Ireland on June 12. Not realising that the passenger services of the Tralee and Dingle Light Railway had been closed fourteen months earlier, he asked when the next train to Dublin was. He was arrested and interned in the Curragh Camp for the duration of the war.

6th Patrol

U-38 would depart Wilhelmshaven for the last time on 1 August 1940, again with Heinrich Liebe in command. On this month long patrol off the western coast of Ireland, U-38 would hit and sink three ships, all of which were in convoy at the time of attack. On 7 August the Egyptian liner SS Mohamed Ali El-Kebir was sunk while traveling with HX-61, from Halifax to Gibraltar, 320 died The British steam freighter SS Llanfair was hit and sunk, traveling as part of convoy SL-41 from Sierra Leone to England. The third and final ship hit on the sixth patrol of U-38 was the British steam freighter SS Har Zion, while traveling with the convoy OB-225, from Liverpool to the United States. After his four weeks at sea Liebe returned U-38 to its new home port of Lorient, France on 3 September 1940.

7th Patrol

For her first patrol from Lorient, France, and her seventh career patrol, U-38 would again be under the command of Heinrich Liebe. U-38 departed on 25 September, for operations in the Northwest Approaches. She would hit five ships on this patrol, sinking four of them. On 1 October, the British motor freighter MV Highland Patriot was torpedoed and sunk. After two weeks of no victories, U-38 sank the Greek steam freighter SS Aenos on 17 October, sailing as part of convoy SC-7, from Sydney, Nova Scotia to England. The following day, the British steam freighter SS Carsbreck was damaged, but not sunk, while traveling with the convoy SC-7 from Sydney to Grimsby, England. On 19 October, two ships were hit, both sailing as part of the convoy HX-79: the Dutch SS Bilderdijk and the British steam freighter SS Matheran. Following these successes, U-38 returned to Lorient on 24 October 1940

8th Patrol

Again, U-38 would depart Lorient with Liebe in command on 18 December 1940. The eighth war patrol of her career would again involve operations in the Northwest Approaches. During this patrol, U-38 would hit and sink two ships. On 27 December, U-38 sank the British ship SS Waiotira, and on 31 December, she sank the Swedish motor freighter SS Valparaiso, sailing as part of the convoy HX-97 from Halifax to Glasgow. U-38 returned to port on 22 January 1941.

9th Patrol

U-38 would spend two and a half months in port, before leaving for operations off the western coast of Africa on 9 April 1941, with Heinrich Liebe yet again in command. This would prove to be U-38's most successful patrol, with the sinking of eight ships. On 4 May, the Swedish steam freighter SS Japan was torpedoed and sunk while traveling with convoy OB-310 from England to the United States. The following day, the British motor freighter MV Queen Maud was torpedoed and sunk. On 23 May, the Dutch motor freighter SS Berhala was sunk while traveling with the convoy OB-318, from England to America. The British steam freighter SS Vulcain was torpedoed and sunk on 24 May. Six days later, on 29 May, the British steam freighter SS Tabaristan was hit and sunk. The following day another British ship was sunk, the steam freighter SS Empire Protector. On 31 May, the Norwegian steam freighter SS Rinda was torpedoed and sunk as well. The eighth, and final ship sunk during U-38's eighth patrol was the British steam freighter SS Kingston Hill on 8 June. U-38 then returned to Lorient on 29 June 1941, after spending eleven and one half weeks at sea.


10th Patrol

For the first time in her career, U-38 would head to sea with a new commander, Kapitn zur See Heinrich Schuch. U-38 left on 6 August, for a five-week patrol in the North Atlantic. During this time one ship was hit, the Panamanian steam freighter SS Longtanker on 18 August. U-38 returned to Lorient on 14 September 1941.

11th and 12th Patrols

U-38 would depart from Lorient for the last time on 15 October, again with Heinrich Schuch in command. Her eleventh patrol was to take place in the North Atlantic. During a period of five weeks though, not a single ship was hit and U-38 traveled to the German U-boat base in Bergen, Norway on 21 November. She would later depart Bergen on 23 November and arrive in Stettin on 29 November 1941.

Life after active duty

From December 1941 through November 1943, U-38 was used as a training boat in the Unterseebootsflottille and the  Unterseebootsflottille. After serving for two years as a training boat, U-38 was used as a testing boat, until she was scuttled by her crew on 5 May 1945

During her service in the German Kriegsmarine, U-38 sank 35 commercial ships for 188,967 GRT, and damaged another commercial ship for 3,670 GR

6 September 1939     Manaar      United Kingdom British     7,242      sunk at 3828'N 1050'W? / ?38.467N 10.833W? / 38.467; -10.833? (Manaar (ship))
11 September 1939     Inverliffey Republic of Ireland[notes 1][9]      United Kingdom British     9,456      sunk at 4814'N 1148'W? / ?48.233N 11.8W? / 48.233; -11.8? (Inverliffey (ship))
7 December 1939     Thomas Walton     United Kingdom British     4,460     sunk at 6752'N 1428'E? / ?67.867N 14.467E? / 67.867; 14.467? (Thomas Walton (ship))
11 December 1939     Garoufalia     Greece Greek      4,708     sunk at 6436'N 1042'E? / ?64.6N 10.7E? / 64.6; 10.7? (Garoufalia (ship))
13 December 1939     Deptford     United Kingdom British     4,101     sunk at 6215'N 0508'E? / ?62.25N 5.133E? / 62.25; 5.133? (Deptford (ship))
9 March 1940     Leukos     Republic of Ireland Irish     216     sunk at 5520'N 0845'W? / ?55.333N 8.75W? / 55.333; -8.75? (Leukos (ship))
17 March 1940     Argentina     Denmark Danish      5,375     sunk at 6047'N 0030'W? / ?60.783N 0.5W? / 60.783; -0.5? (Argentina (ship))
21 March 1940     Algier     Denmark Danish      1,654     sunk at 6017'N 0249'W? / ?60.283N 2.817W? / 60.283; -2.817? (Algier (ship))
21 March 1940     Christiansborg     Denmark Danish     3,270     sunk at 6017'N 0249'W? / ?60.283N 2.817W? / 60.283; -2.817? (Christiansborg (ship))
26 March 1940     Cometa     Norway Norwegian      3,794     sunk at 6006'N 0436'W? / ?60.1N 4.6W? / 60.1; -4.6? (Cometa (ship))
2 April 1940     Signe     Finland Finnish      1,540     sunk at 5852'N 0131'W? / ?58.867N 1.517W? / 58.867; -1.517? (Signe (ship))
14 June 1940     Mount Myrto     Greece Greek      5,403     sunk at 5003'N 1005'W? / ?50.05N 10.083W? / 50.05; -10.083? (Mount Myrto (ship))
15 June 1940     Erik Boye     Canada Canadian      2,238     sunk at 5037'N 0844'W? / ?50.617N 8.733W? / 50.617; -8.733? (Erik Boye (ship))
15 June 1940     Italia     Norway Norwegian      9,973     sunk at 5037'N 0844'W? / ?50.617N 8.733W? / 50.617; -8.733? (Italia (ship))
20 June 1940     Tilia Gorthon     Sweden Swedish      1,776     sunk at 4832'N 0620'W? / ?48.533N 6.333W? / 48.533; -6.333? (Tilia Gorthon (ship))
21 June 1940     Luxembourg     Belgium Belgian      5,809     sunk at 4725'N 0455'W? / ?47.417N 4.917W? / 47.417; -4.917? (Luxembourg (ship))
22 June 1940     Neion     Greece Greek      5,154     sunk at 4709'N 0417'W? / ?47.15N 4.283W? / 47.15; -4.283? (Neion (ship))
7 August 1940     Mohamed Ali El-Kebir     United Kingdom British     7,529     sunk at 5522'N 1318'W? / ?55.367N 13.3W? / 55.367; -13.3? (Mohamed Ali El-Kebir (ship))
11 August 1940     Llanfair     United Kingdom British     4,966     sunk at 5448'N 1346'W? / ?54.8N 13.767W? / 54.8; -13.767? (Llanfair (ship))
31 August 1940     Har Zion     United Kingdom British     2,508     sunk at 5620'N 1000'W? / ?56.333N 10W? / 56.333; -10? (Har Zion (ship))
1 October 1940     Highland Patriot     United Kingdom British     14,172     sunk at 5220'N 1904'W? / ?52.333N 19.067W? / 52.333; -19.067? (Highland Patriot (ship))
17 October 1940     Aenos     Greece Greek      3,554     sunk at 5900'N 1300'W? / ?59N 13W? / 59; -13? (Aenos (ship))
18 October 1940     Carsbreck     United Kingdom British     3,670     damaged at 3620'N 1050'W? / ?36.333N 10.833W? / 36.333; -10.833? (Carsbreck (ship))
19 October 1940     Bilderdijk     Netherlands Dutch     6,856     sunk at 5635'N 1715'W? / ?56.583N 17.25W? / 56.583; -17.25? (Bilderdijk (ship))
19 October 1940     Matheran     United Kingdom British     7,653     sunk at 5700'N 1700'W? / ?57N 17W? / 57; -17? (Matheran (ship))
27 December 1940     Waiotira     United Kingdom British     12,823     sunk at 5810'N 1656'W? / ?58.167N 16.933W? / 58.167; -16.933? (Waiotira (ship))
31 December 1940     Valparaiso     Sweden Swedish      3,760     sunk at 6001'N 2300'W? / ?60.017N 23W? / 60.017; -23? (Valparaiso (ship))
4 May 1941     Japan     Sweden Swedish      5,230     sunk at 0950'N 1750'W? / ?9.833N 17.833W? / 9.833; -17.833? (Japan (ship))
5 May 1940     Queen Maud     United Kingdom British     4,976     sunk at 0754'N 1641'W? / ?7.9N 16.683W? / 7.9; -16.683? (Queen Maud (ship))
23 May 1940     Berhala     Netherlands Dutch      6,622     sunk at 0950'N 1750'W? / ?9.833N 17.833W? / 9.833; -17.833? (Berhala (ship))
24 May 1941     Vulcain     United Kingdom British      4,362     sunk at 0920'N 1535'W? / ?9.333N 15.583W? / 9.333; -15.583? (Vulcain (ship))
29 May 1941     Tabaristan     United Kingdom British     6,251     sunk at 0632'N 1523'W? / ?6.533N 15.383W? / 6.533; -15.383? (Tabaristan (ship))
30 May 1941     Empire Protector     United Kingdom British     6,181     sunk at 0600'N 1425'W? / ?6N 14.417W? / 6; -14.417? (Empire Protector (ship))
31 May 1941     Rinda     Norway Norwegian      6,029     sunk at 0652'N 1514'W? / ?6.867N 15.233W? / 6.867; -15.233? (Rinda (ship))
8 June 1941     Kingston Hill     United Kingdom British     7,628     sunk at 0935'N 2940'W? / ?9.583N 29.667W? / 9.583; -29.667? (Kingston Hill (ship))
18 August 1941     Longtaker     Panama Panamanian      1,700

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WYLER presented its first 16 and 19-line precision movements to the public in 1927. The particularity of these was the INCAFLEX balance wheel, which was legendary at the time. The WYLER INCAFLEX balance wheel is protected along its diameter by two curved, elastic arms, which absorb any shocks to the balance wheel. In 1937 the company caused a stir by launching a water-resistant watch that was not fitted with the conventional soft gaskets. The crystal was pressed in between the edge of the case and a pressed or screwed bezel, the gap between the winding shaft and the watch case was sealed hydraulically by fitting the winding shaft and bushing together, in the same material, to 1/500mm.



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