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Date/Report Number:.082914:EGST-AF43-3322 ItemELGIN USAA A-8 JITTERBUG NAVIGATION AND GROUNDSPEED TIMER
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Description of item:  ORIGINAL VINTAGE 1943 WWII US Army Airforce 96th Bombardment Squadron ELGIN USAA A-8 JITTERBUG NAVIGATION AND GROUNDSPEED TIMER WITH HI PERFORMANCE SUPER HI-BEAT 15 JEWEL ELGIN GRADE 582 1/30-SECOND MILITARY MOVEMENT. WITH LEATHER POCKET FOB WITH SIGNED 1943 90TH BOMBARDMENT SQUADRON PEP-PIN. Case Info: TYPE A-8 SPEC NO. 94-27749 SER NO. AF43-3322 MFRS PART NO. 1778 ORD NO. W5351C-34898. Condition is fine to mint.

Estimated Retail Replacement Value $489.00


Reports are supplied at the request of the customer and it is for the customer's exclusive use. Reports express an opinion of the time of the examination of the jewelry. This report is for customers use only for the following two purposes, indicating estimated retail replacement value to obtain insurance coverage, or for the purpose of providing geological information. goldsmith Works does not guarantee that the appraisal valuation will result in a sale at the price. Estimated retail replacement value is arrived after analyses of what the approximate high retail cash asking price is for labor, materials, and design. These prices may be substantially higher than actual transaction or warranty with regards to any item described in the report, since jewelry grading is not an exact science, this  report represent the best opinion of the company. GoldSmith Works is in no case responsible for differences that occur by repeated grading by other experts in the field and/or use of other standards, norms, methods or criteria other than those used by GoldSmith Works. GoldSmith Works is expressly held harmless by customers including, but with out limitation for any claims or actions that may arise out of negligence in connection with the preparation of this laboratory report, or actions based upon the customer's use of the report. The information on the carat weight, clarity grade, color grade on the report is approximate due to the limitations in jewelry grading. The item was tested, graded, and examined under 10x magnification using the techniques and equipment available to GoldSmith Works, including fully corrected triplet loupe, binocular microscope, master color comparison guides, diamond color comparison tools, electronic carat balance, non-contact optical measuring device, and ancillary instruments necessary at the time of Exam

 

 

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ORIGINAL
VINTAGE
1943
WWII

96th Bomb Squadron.jpg
96th Bombardment Squadron,

ELGIN
USAA
A-8
JITTERBUG
NAVIGATION TIMER

WITH

HI PERFORMANCE
SUPER HI-BEAT
15 JEWEL

[ONLY 3 TIMERS HAD OVER 7 JEWELS]
MILITARY MOVEMENT

WITH
LEATHER POCKET FOB
WITH SIGNED 1943
90TH BOMBARDMENT SQUADRON
PEP-PIN



IMG_4873.JPG (155091 bytes)

CLICK HERE FOR VIDEO
OF THIS JITTERBUG IN OPERATION

TYPE A-8
SPEC NO. 94-27749
SER NO. AF43-3322
MFRS PART NO. 1778
ORD NO. W5351C-34898

ELGIN

Grade 582 1/30-second timer used by the US Army-Airforce and known as Watch. Navigation (Ground Speed) Type A-8.

One of its most important uses of the A-8    was for navigation. Air speed indicators on WWII aircraft were controlled by air being forced into the air speed indicator as you flew your plane. The problem was that as you gained altitude less and less air entered the device and there was always a wind blowing and your speed relative to the ground is going to be either lower or higher depending on whether you are flying into the wind or with the wind.

To make corrections and get  your actual speed relative to the ground you needed to do some arithmetic. You had to figure your actual ground-speed and compare it to the airspeed indicator and then adjust your navigation calculations accordingly. The pilot or navigator would pick out, say, a pair of known parallel roads or other landmarks about 5 to 10 miles apart early in your flight and the measure the distance between them using the scale on a map, they would then click this 10 second timer on and then off as they flew from one to the other. Some basic [for those that were trained] calculations and division and they had their actual ground speed.


96th Bomb Squadron.jpg
World War I

Before embarking upon its first aerial warfare mission, the 96th BOMB SQ agreed upon a black triangle outlined by a white strip enclosing the profile of a red dare devil thumbing his nose at the ground with onr of his hands while he held a white bomb in his other hand. This distinctive emblem was designed by Harry O. Lawson,  the squadron's graphic artist, Symbolic of the “Daredevil” qualities of fearlessness and boldness, the dare devil characterizes the spirit of the Squadron and its past and present personnel. The bomb represents the historic mission of the unit, which it has performed since the beginning of aerial warfare in World War I

THE 96TH  Aero Squadron was America's first bomb squadron. It was formed at Kelly Field, Texas. Originally consisting of 80 college graduate and dropout volunteers whom passed the U.S.Army Air Service' highest and most stringent aeronautical qualifications to join what was to be an elite group.

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THE  WWII 96TH BSQ JACKET PATCH IMPOSED UPON A SIGNED PEP-PIN
AND
A  WWII USAAF PIN WITH HAP ARNOLD WINGS WAS A PIN
WORE BY THE WIVES OF WWII USAAF PILOTS

The 96th saw combat as part of the 1st Day Bombardment Group, supporting the French Eighth and U.S. First Army from June through November 1918. It operated French-made Breguet 14 planes and was involved in an embarrassing fiasco when the entire squadron landed around Koblenz, Germany by accident, providing all of their planes intact to the Germans. Nonetheless, it was the most heavily engaged and most successful USAS bomber squadron.


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SIGNED: 96TH BOMBARDMENT SQUADRON

US Army Air Corps Hap Arnold Wings.svg

USAA WERE THE US ARMY AIRCORPS
THE AIR CORPS BECAME THE USAAF / US  ARMY AIR FORCE IN JUNE OF 1941
THE USAAF BECAME THE USAF FOR US AIR FORCE IN 1947

The 96th Returned to the United States from France in May, 1919 and was equipped with Martin MB-2 day bombers, its primary mission was reconnaissance along the Mexican border and became part of the First Provisional Air Brigade under General Billy Mitchell.

 

TITLED "THE JITTERBUG"
DUE TO THE SMALL BALANCE THAT
ROTATES BACK AND FORTH
SO FAST IT SOUNDS LIKE A JITTERBUG

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1A-JITTERBUG.jpg (54602 bytes)

YOU CAN SEE HOW SMALL IT IS

Trained with the Handley Page O/400 and Martin MB-2 bombers. its ytaining and demonstration mission would be to attack captured German ships along the Atlantic coast off Virginia to determine whether a battleship could be sunk by bombing. The targets were an aged and surplus US battleship and four former German Navy vessels, including the battleship SMS Ostfriesland. The excersize began with low yeild bombs and graduated to the new, larger bombs.  Eventually the squadron would began dropping 2,000-pound bombs. Twenty-two minutes after the first bomb fell, the old battleship SMS Ostfriesland.sank .

Color Photographed B-17E in Flight.jpg

In the summer of 1939, the squadron. one of three,  received its first Boeing B-17B Fortress . In November 1939, seven Fortresses flew from Langley Field to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on a good-will mission. All planes returned safely with no major incidents, demonstrating the safety and reliability of the B-17 design

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TYPE A-8 [MIL DESIGNATION] AF [AIR FORCE] 43 [YEAR] 

World War II


Lockheed B17G Fortress 96th Bomb Squadron

After the Attack on Pearl Harbor, the 96th served on antisubmarine duty along the mid-Atlantic coastline . Then re-equipped with B-17F Flying Fortresses, the 96th was assigned to the Pacific Northwest for transition and combat training in late 942 and early 1943.Then they were moved to North Africa in April 1943 to carry out bombing missions in Algeria and Tunisia as part of Twelfth Air Force during the North African Campaign.

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The missions included support and interdictory, as well as bombing targets that included marshalling yards, airdromes, troop concentrations, bridges, docks, and shipping. Participated in the defeat of Axis forces in Tunisia, Apr-May 1943; the reduction of Pantelleria and the preparations for the invasion of Sicily, May-Jul 1943; the invasion of Italy, Sep 1943.

Transferred to Fifteenth Air Force in December 1943, the 96th engaged in bombing operations in Italy in support of the Allied drive north toward Rome; the Invasion of southern France, and the campaigns against German forces in northern Italy, Jun 1944-May 1945. Their primary mission being the long-range bombardment of strategic targets, the 96th attacked oil refineries, aircraft factories, steel plants, and other objectives in Germany, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Austria, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Romania, and Greece. In one mission, the 96th where enroute to bomb a vital aircraft factory at Steyr on 24 Feb 1944, when the group found itself greatly outnumbered by enemy interceptors, it maintained its formation and bombed the target, receiving a Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) for the performance. On the following day, while on a mission to attack aircraft factories at Regensburg, it met similar opposition equally well and was awarded a second DSC. The 96th served as part of the occupation force in Italy after V-E Day and inactivated in Italy on 28 Feb 1946.

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DOUBLE CASED PUSH BUTTON IN CROWN

Cold War

Reactivated under Strategic Air Command on 1 July 1947 and equipped with B-29 Superfortresses. Trained for strategic bombardment missions during the postwar years, being upgraded to the new atomic bomb-capable B-50 Superfortress in 1948. Replaced the propeller-driven B-50s with new B-47E Stratojet swept-wing medium bombers in 1954, capable of flying at high subsonic speeds and primarily designed for penetrating the airspace of the Soviet Union. In the late 1950s, the B-47 was considered to be reaching obsolescence, and was being phased out of SAC's strategic arsenal.

Image result for Strategic Air Command
SAC

In September 1996, the 96th deployed and launched attacks against military targets in Iraq in support of Operation Desert Strike. It earned the 1996 Mackay Trophy for the 33-hour long mission from Louisiana to Iraq and back as the most meritorious flight of the year.

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Since 1993 it has conducted combat operations to support worldwide conventional and nuclear taskings and provided long-range, heavy strike, initial response, and sustained firepower in support of all regional and global war fighting commanders.

In late 1996, the squadron deployed to support Operation Southern Watch, returning again in 1998. In 1999, crews from the squadron deployed to Royal Air Force Base Fairford in support of Operation Allied Force.

In January 2002, the squadron deployed to fly combat missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom over Afghanistan.

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It supported OEF until early 2007 when it began focusing full-time on the Continuous Bomber Presence mission in the Pacific Theater. The squadron supported deployments in 2004, 2006, 2008, 2009 and again in 2011 to Andersen AFB, Guam

In 2011, as part of Air Force Global Strike Command's Global Strike Challenge (successor to SAC's Bomb Comp), the 96th Bomb Squadron won three awards:

The Bartsch Trophy for Best ECM Score beating 9 other B-52 squadrons/units,
The Mitchell Trophy for Best Bomb Score
(6 meter BDU-50, beating 19 other B-1, B-2 and B-52 squadrons/units), and
The Linebacker Trophy for Best B-52 Squadron in 2011
 

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Lineage

  • Organized as 96th Aero Squadron (Day Bombardment) on 20 August 1917
Re-designated: 96th Squadron (Bombardment) on 14 March 1921
Re-designated: 96th Bombardment Squadron on 25 January 1923
Re-designated: 96th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 6 December 1939
Re-designated: 96th Bombardment Squadron, Heavy, c. 6 March 1944
Inactivated on 28 February 1946
  • Re-designated 96th Bombardment Squadron, Very Heavy, on 5 April 1946
Activated on 1 July 1947
Re-designated 96th Bombardment Squadron, Medium, on 28 May 1948
Discontinued, and inactivated, on 1 April 1963
  • Re-designated 96th Bomb Squadron on 28 September 1993
Activated on 1 October 1993
  • Designated as: 96th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron when deployed as part of an Air and Space Expeditionary unit after 1 January 1998.

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Stations

World War I

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Inter-War period
  • Mitchel Field, New York, 2 May 1919
  • Ellington Field, Texas, 26 May 1919
  • Camp Furlong, New Mexico, c. 28 June 1919
  • Fort Bliss, Texas, 3 July 1919
Flight operated from Douglas Airport, Arizona, c. 10 August 1919-10 January 1920
  • Kelly Field, Texas, 12 January 1920
Operated from Langley Field, Virginia, 20 May-26 October 1921
  • Langley Field, Virginia, 30 June 1922

 

World War II
 
United States Air Force
  • Andrews Field, Maryland, 1 Jul 1947
  • Davis-Monthan Field (later, AFB), Arizona, 24 Sep 1947
  • Chatham AFB, Georgia, 1 May 1949
  • Hunter AFB, Georgia, 29 September 1950 – 1 April 1963
Deployed at: RAF Bassingbourn, England, 4 May-24 September 1951
Deployed at: RAF Upper Heyford, England, 4 September-3 December 1952
Deployed at: Sidi Slimane AB, French Morocco, 11 August-20 September 1954 and 6 July-24 August 1956
  • Barksdale AFB, Louisiana, 1 October 1993 – Present.

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Aircraft