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Date/Report Number …...010112-76668  Item  1943-WWII-PT-104-TORPEDO-BOAT-CREW-MEMBER-RECORD-MILITARY-WATCH
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Description of item: VINTAGE 1943 WWII PT 104 TORPEDO BOAT CREW MEMBER'S RECORD MILITARY SWEEP SECONDS HACK WATCH WITH OUR BEST HAND MADE GENUINE OSTRICH IN RICH HABANA WITH DUAL BUTTON QUICK RELEASE STAINLESS STEEL DEPLOYMENT BUCKLE

.Estimated Retail Replacement Value $980.00


Reports are supplied at the request of the customer and it is for the customer's exclusive use. Reports express an opinion of the time of the examination of the jewelry. This report is for customers use only for the following two purposes, indicating estimated retail replacement value to obtain insurance coverage, or for the purpose of providing geological information. goldsmith Works does not guarantee that the appraisal valuation will result in a sale at the price. Estimated retail replacement value is arrived after analyses of what the approximate high retail cash asking price is for labor, materials, and design. These prices may be substantially higher than actual transaction or warranty with regards to any item described in the report, since jewelry grading is not an exact science, this  report represent the best opinion of the company. GoldSmith Works is in no case responsible for differences that occur by repeated grading by other experts in the field and/or use of other standards, norms, methods or criteria other than those used by GoldSmith Works. GoldSmith Works is expressly held harmless by customers including, but with out limitation for any claims or actions that may arise out of negligence in connection with the preparation of this laboratory report, or actions based upon the customer's use of the report. The information on the carat weight, clarity grade, color grade on the report is approximate due to the limitations in jewelry grading. The item was tested, graded, and examined under 10x magnification using the techniques and equipment available to GoldSmith Works, including fully corrected triplet loupe, binocular microscope, master color comparison guides, diamond color comparison tools, electronic carat balance, non-contact optical measuring device, and ancillary instruments necessary at the time of Exam

 

 

 


1943
WWII
PT 104
TORPEDO BOAT
CREW MEMBER'S
RECORD
MILITARY
SWEEP SECONDS HACK
WATCH

WITH

OUR BEST
HAND MADE
GENUINE OSTRICH
IN
RICH HABANA


WITH

DUAL BUTTON
QUICK RELEASE
STAINLESS STEEL
DEPLOYMENT BUCKLE

**************************************************

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ROCK RECEIVED A HOST OF
WWII
NAVY MEMORABILIA
INCLUDING
SOUTH PACIFIC MAPS & LOGS
AWARDS AND DECORATIONS
A NAVY OFFICERS CAP
A RIBBON FOR THE BATTLE OF THE PHILIPPINES
PHOTOGRAPHS
AND
HIDDEN IN THE LOT
THIS
AWESOME
UNBELIEVABLE
COOL
STUNNING
FANTASTIC
INCREDIBLE

RECORD WATCH
WITH
ANCHOR & PT 104
DESIGNATION

 


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THE SOLOMAN ISLANDS
1942-43

The Japanese began the Solomon Islands campaign On December 7, 1941:

After failing to resolve a dispute with the United States over Japan's actions in China and French Indochina, the Japanese attacked the US Pacific fleet at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The attack crippled most of the U.S. Pacific Fleet's battleships and started a formal state of war between the two nations. Attacks on British Empire possessions in the Pacific, beginning with an attack on Hong Kong almost simultaneous with the Pearl Harbor attack, brought the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand into the conflict. In launching this war, Japanese leaders sought to neutralize the U.S. fleet, seize possessions rich in natural resources, and obtain strategic military bases to defend their far-flung empire. In the words of the Japanese Navy's Combined Fleet Secret Order Number One, dated November 1, 1941, the goals of the initial Japanese campaigns in the impending war were to, "End the British and American strength from the Netherlands Indies and the Philippines and establish a policy of autonomous self-sufficiency and economic independence.

 

Pacific War of World War II Solomon Islands Campaign 1942

The Empire of Japan accomplished its initial strategic objectives in the first six months of the war, capturing the Philippines, Thailand, Malaya, Singapore, the Dutch East Indies, Wake Island, New Britain, Gilbert Islands, and Guam. A Japanese goal was to establish an effective defensive perimeter from British India on the west, through the Dutch East Indies on the south, and to island bases in the south and central Pacific as its southeastern line of defense. Anchoring its defensive positions in the South Pacific was the major Japanese army and navy base at Rabaul, New Britain, which was captured in January 1942. In March and April, Japanese forces occupied and began constructing an airfield at Buka in northern Bougainville, as well as an airfield and naval base at Buin, in southern Bougainville.n then converged with the New Guinea campaign.he  Japanese landed and occupied several areas in the British Solomon Islands, and Bougainville and began the construction of  naval and air bases with the goals of protecting the flank of the Japanese offensive in New Guinea, establishing a security barrier for the major Japanese base at Rabaul on New Britain, and providing bases for interdicting supply lines between the Allied powers of the United States and Australia and New Zealand.

 

The USA Guadalcanal 1943

The Allies, in order to defend their communication and supply lines in the South Pacific, supported a counteroffensive in New Guinea, isolated the Japanese base at Rabaul, and counterattacked the Japanese in the Solomons with landings on Guadalcanal and small neighboring islands on 7 August 1942. These landings initiated a series of combined-arms battles between the two adversaries, beginning with the Guadalcanal landing and continuing with several battles in the central and northern Solomons, on and around New Georgia Island, and Bougainville Island. It was a campaign of attrition fought on land, on sea, and in the air,wearing  the J

The Allies created a combined air formation, Cactus Air Force, establishing air superiority during the daylight hours. The Japanese then resorted to nightly resupply missions which they called "Rat Transportation"  through New Georgia Sound ("The Slot"). Many pitched battles were fought trying to stop Japanese supplies from getting through. So many ships were lost by both sides during the Guadalacanal campaign that the southern end of New Georgia Sound, the area north of Guadalcanal previously called Savo Sound, became known as "Ironbottom Sound".

Allied success in the Solomon Islands campaign prevented the Japanese from cutting Australia and New Zealand off from the U.S. Operation Cartwheel — the Allied grand strategy for the Solomons and New Guinea campaigns — launched on June 30, 1943, isolated and neutralized Rabaul and destroyed much of Japan's sea and air supremacy. This opened the way for Allied forces to recapture the Philippines and cut off Japan from its crucial resource areas in the Netherlands East Indies.



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c. 1943
A PT boat patrolling off New Guinea
National Archives photo 80-G-53855 from the collection of Joseph N. Myers
Courtesy of Bob Myers


THE PT BOAT

PT Boats were a variety of small, fast  torpedo boats ("Patrol Torpedo") used by the United States Navy in World War II to attack larger surface ships. The PT boat squadrons were nicknamed "the mosquito fleet". The Japanese called them "Devil Boats".

During World War II, American PT boats engaged enemy destroyers and numerous other surface craft, ranging from small boats to large supply ships. PT boats also operated as gunboats against enemy small craft, such as armored barges used by the Japanese forces for inter-island transport

A PT boat had only a small crew OF 9, an officer and eight men, but each man had to know something of the other's job. Officers were expected to be specialists in everything.

Navigation seamanship with communications, able to read charts, pilot books, use of dividers, parallel rules, handling a sextant and chronometer, were all crucial to the successful operation of the P.T. boat and the safe return from any assigned mission.

The first boats were 70 feet long with 20 foot beams. They drew 4 feet, and weighed about 32 tons. those ussed in the pacific command were slightly larger. Three 12 cylinder engines drove triple screws. The boats had a radius of 1,500 miles at 12 knots, but could go 2000 miles at 9 knots on one engine. They could reach a top speed of about 70 knots, 50 knots in rough seas.

PTs would usually attack under the cover of night. The cockpits of PT boats were protected against small arms fire and splinters by armor plate. Direct hits from Japanese guns could and did result in catastrophic gasoline explosions with near-total crew loss. They feared attack by Japanese seaplanes, which were hard to detect even with radar, but which could easily spot the phosphorescent wake left by PT propellers. Bombing attacks killed and wounded crews even with near misses. There are several recorded instances of PT boats trading fire with friendly aircraft, a situation also familiar to U.S. submariners. Several PT boats were lost due to "friendly fire" from both Allied aircraft and destroyers.

The effectiveness of PT boats in the Solomon Islands campaign, where there were numerous engagements between PTs and capital ships as well as against Japanese shipborne resupply efforts dubbed "The Tokyo Express" in "the Slot", was substantially undermined by defective Mark 8 torpedoes. The Japanese were initially cautious when operating their capital ships in areas known to have PT boats, since they knew how dangerous their own Type 93s were, and assumed the Americans had equally lethal weapons. The PT boats at Guadalcanal were given credit for several sinkings and successes against the vaunted Tokyo Express. In several engagements, the mere presence of PTs was sufficient to disrupt heavily escorted Japanese resupply activities at Guadalcanal. Afterwards, the PT mission in the Solomon Islands was deemed a success

 

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PT 109

President John F Kennedy commanded PT 109 as a Junior Leiutenent in WWII in the South Pacific. He would become a hero after his ship was sunk and he helped his crew to safety. A book and movey would help him win the Presidency.

 

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PT 104

MOTOR TORPEDO BOAT SQUADRON 18
Commissioned March 27, 1943; decom missioned November 1, 1945.
Squadron Commanders:

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Instead of the drive train turning the dial protruding shaft/pinion at 6 position connected to the tiny second hand, they mounted a large brass/alloy wheel on the opposite side of the shaft that now protruded through the bridge. That wheel turned a wheel on top of a NEW center "shaft' held in position be a new this jeweled bridge that went through a new HOLLOW center cannon pinion in the center of the movement that then protruded through the center of the dial where a new long ***sweep second hand attached.

***sweep second hand
technically, "sweep" usually means rotating round without TICKS. In other words, smoothly rather than "ticking" by second round. In this write up, we are using sweep in a general way to better explain our history and science. It made no difference whether it was ticks or moves smooth, the idea being that one had a large second hand that went round in tune with the movement and the chapter ring so one could count, time & now even synchronize.