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Date/Report Number …..051214.LWW Item 1: VINTAGE  LEMANIA ANTI-SUB 6 SECOND TIMER. 1982-1992.
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Description of item: VINTAGE  LEMANIA ANTI-SUB 6 SECOND TIMER. 1982-1992. PATTERN 6. 

.Estimated Retail Replacement Value W/BOX $775.00


Reports are supplied at the request of the customer and it is for the customer's exclusive use. Reports express an opinion of the time of the examination of the jewelry. This report is for customers use only for the following two purposes, indicating estimated retail replacement value to obtain insurance coverage, or for the purpose of providing geological information. goldsmith Works does not guarantee that the appraisal valuation will result in a sale at the price. Estimated retail replacement value is arrived after analyses of what the approximate high retail cash asking price is for labor, materials, and design. These prices may be substantially higher than actual transaction or warranty with regards to any item described in the report, since jewelry grading is not an exact science, this  report represent the best opinion of the company. GoldSmith Works is in no case responsible for differences that occur by repeated grading by other experts in the field and/or use of other standards, norms, methods or criteria other than those used by GoldSmith Works. GoldSmith Works is expressly held harmless by customers including, but with out limitation for any claims or actions that may arise out of negligence in connection with the preparation of this laboratory report, or actions based upon the customer's use of the report. The information on the carat weight, clarity grade, color grade on the report is approximate due to the limitations in jewelry grading. The item was tested, graded, and examined under 10x magnification using the techniques and equipment available to GoldSmith Works, including fully corrected triplet loupe, binocular microscope, master color comparison guides, diamond color comparison tools, electronic carat balance, non-contact optical measuring device, and ancillary instruments necessary at the time of Exam

 

 

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LEMANIA ANTI-SUB TIMER

IEvery revolution of this timer equals 6 seconds/5000 yards, the A-8 was 10 seconds, so this timer is faster yet as accurate as the vaunted A-8.  Why 6 seconds?   The rapid 6 second per revolution has to do with underwater sound. Under water sound travels at approx 1450 to 1500 m/s or (1586 to 1640 yards/s). Aping reflecting from a target at 1600 yards would return in approx 2 seconds. It is stated this 6 seconds per revolution utilized  by asdic/sonar operators on sub-chasers, cruisers and destroyers to find subs and on subs to find prey, and evade destroyers

Lemania
Destroyer Anti-sub Timer

The last recorded use of the Lemania Destroyer Anti-sub Timer was the Lemania No 6 Pattern Destroyer Anti-sub Timer utilized by the British in both the Falkland War & Desert Storm in support of the US Invasion of Iraq.

There is no doubt these military timers were made by one of the greatest Chronograph - Complicated watch-movement companies in the world. This unique 6 second yardage timer was utilized in submarine warfare. By Anti-Sub Ships, Destroyers and Submarines for both    offensive & defensive efforst. And though in the 1990's, with many systems in military use computerized, timers like this one were/are not dated as long as Sonar was still in use.

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One of the first Pattern No 6 Timers for WWII   was made by Waltham Watch Co for the British and titled Waltham Admiralty Pattern 6.

Lemania, known for the excellent top end military chronographs as far back as the beginning of WWI, soon followed with their own Lemania version of the WWII Waltham Admiralty Pattern 6 [pattern 6 is British type number]. These were issued to anti submarine ships and subs as late as   both the Falkland War and DESERT STORM to aid sonar operators locate and destroy Subs --as well as Allied subs to evade or attack destroyers and/or Anti-Sub Ships.

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Additionally,   in 1990, during Desert Storm, the Senior British Royal Naval Officer in the Middle East was Captain Anthony McEwen (Flag HMS York), then Commodore Paul Haddocks, and finally Commodore Christopher Craig, on HMS Brave and HMS London.

The Royal Navy made a significant contribution to Allied efforts in the early stages of the war. In particular, Royal Navy Westland Lynx helicopters were responsible for the destruction of almost the entire Iraqi Navy.

Additionally, Royal Navy minehunters cleared Iraqi mines near the Kuwaiti coast, allowing the US battleships Wisconsin and Missouri to move in close enough to launch devastating bombardments against Iraqi ground forces.

HMS Gloucester intercepted an Iraqi Silkworm Missile bound for the US Battleships. The date of this timer coincides with the Royal Navy operations. I have yet to discover timers with dates past the nineties.

 

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Frigates
Leander Class (HMS Jupiter)Broadsword Class (HMS Battleaxe, HMS Brazen, HMS London)
Destroyers
Sheffield Class (HMS York, HMS Gloucester, HMS Exeter, HMS Manchester, HMS Cardiff)
Submarines
HMS Opossum
Fleet Support Tankers
RFA Orangeleaf
Fast Fleet Tankers
RFA Olna
Stores Ships
RFA Regent
RFA Fort Grange

 

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NOTE: THE FACT THAT SECONDS AND YARD ARE TIMED
THIS IS RARE IN MILITARY TIMERS. WWI and II HAD
SOME THAT WERE UTILIZED ON SUBMARINES
NOTE THAT THERE IS NO
SUB-DIAL OR COUNTER DIAL
THEY WERE  SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED
FOR SHIP WAR FARE

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LWC
LEMANIA WATCH COMPANY

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This fully, perfectly operating : SUB CHASER/SUBMARINER 6 SEC BRITISH MILITARY TIMER was made by LEMANIA WATCH CO , one of the greatest Watch, Timer, Chronograph AND, Complicated watch-movement companies in the world during WWI WWII AND UP TO 1998.I

The first British WWII Contract For *Pattern No 6, *6 second Naval Service Timers, was made by Waltham and signed   "*Admiralty Pattern NO 6 " on their dials as stated by British Contracts..Thus all those that followed were named the same.

During WWI and WWII the Lemania Aniti-Sub/Anti/Destroyer was utilized both in the British Naby and the US NAVY.

The US Navy and Army Airforce as well as the British Admiralty and Air Ministry were precise on their requirements.  Only the highest rated quality timers watches and other devices were purchased.

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This unique 6 second yardage timer was utilized in ANTI-SUB Warfare on both subs and sub Chasers for military offensive & defensive systems. ANTI-SUB could be DESTROYERS, CRUISERS, ANTI-SUB SUB CHASERS AND, OF COURSE, MOSTLY ON SUBMARINES.

Pattern #6 does not mean that  all "PATTERN NO 6 " timers are  "6 second timers" the 6 was for a certain group of timers for certain ministries

The 6 sec ANTI-SUB is the rarest, and most collectible, in fact more than the 10 sec AVIATION Timer by Elgin [we recently placed one that was assigned to British Air Forces] due to it's rare nature and the fact less were made.

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FITZROY
6645 99 520 9355
BRITISH ARROW
2025 / 91
MAX RUN 1 HOUR
BLACK BUCK

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THE HISTORY OF THE
SUBMARINE & SUB-CHASER

UNITED STATES NAVY

In 1776, the first use of a submarine in warfare would occur by American's against the British. The war of course was the Revolutionary War and the craft the American submersible Turtle.

The Turtle was large enough to accommodate one operator and  was entirely hand-powered. Lead ballast  kept the craft balanced as Ezra Lee attempted [ multiple times ]  to attach a time bomb to the hull of British Admiral Richard Howe's flagship Eagle in New York Harbor.

Ultimately, all attempts would fail, but General George Washington would commission it's designer, David Bushnel, an Army engineer. His subsequent invention, drifting mines,  would destroy the British frigate Cereberus and wreak havoc against other British ships.

After the war, David Bushnel became commander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers stationed at West Point. The submarine would wait  until the Iron Clad Ship made it's appearance during the US Civil War.

 

.

The first USN submarine created to protect wooden ships against ironclads was the "Alligator".

Built and in service in 1861-1862. It saw limited duty ,

It was not until 1896 that the USN decided to apply Navy Engineers along with private corporations in development of her history making sub program.

Four years later, on the 11th of  April 1900, the Holland (SS-1) became the first officially commissioned US Navy  submarine.  From then on the Submarine, and it nemesis, the Sub Chaser , would be a part and portion of the USN.

From the first mine laying sub to the first diesel powered sub to the first sub with the ability to have a compartment flooded and survive to a the world record depth  of  256 feet in 1915, US submarines, developed with the ingenuity of Navel Engineers, American companies and the Navel Personal who tested and proved the end products, brought  world renown to the program.

In fact, so renown were US subs that by WWI  the then legendary Imperial Russian Navy ordered 18 subs.

 

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SC-1361

FOR THE USA DURING WWII THE  SC AND PC ANTI SUB SHIPS WERE CREATED

WWII swa SC-497 Class Submarine Chaser: Laid down 3 April 1943 as PC-1361 by the Calderwood Yacht Yard, Inc., Manchester, MA but reclassified SC-1361 later in the month Launched 24 July 1943. Commissioned USS SC-1361, 13 October 1943. Transferred to the Coast and Geodetic Survey 30 September 1945 and commissioned USC&GS Bowen. Named for W. H. Bowen a seaman on the Coast and Geodetic Survey Ship Surveyor, who on October 4, 1927, lost his life by drowning while heroically attempting to save the lives of two shipmates who had fallen in the water. Served as a wire-drag vessel with sister ships the USC&GS Parker, ex-SC-1277 and USC&GS Stirni, ex-SC-1358. Sold for scrap in 1957 to the Boston Metals Co. of Baltimore, MD.

Specifications:
Displacement 148 t.
Length 110' 10"
Beam 17'
Draft 6' 6"
Speed 15.6 kts.
Complement 28
Armament:
One 40mm mount, two .50 cal. machine guns,
two depth charge projector "K Guns,"
two sets Mk 20 Mousetrap rails with four 7.2 projectiles
and two depth charge tracks
Propulsion: Two 880bhp General Motors 8-268A diesel engines,
Snow and Knobstedt single reduction gear, two shafts.

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BRIDGE OF SUB-CHASER
PC 602 USS ALTURAS
H. G Schuessler GM2c
1943-45
Midway,  Saipan, Japan
PHOTO SEPTEMBER 1944

WWII USA SUB CHASER DESTROYER

The submarine chaser was a small and fast naval vessel specifically designed for anti-submarine warfare. Although many nations built similar vessels and used the designation "submarine chaser " , it was a designation famously known around the world for ships built by the US.  Many of the US World War I sub-chasers found their way to friendly powers by way of Lend-Lease in World War II.

U.S. Navy submarine chasers were designed specifically to destroy German submarines in World War I; then Japanese and German submarines in World War II. At 110-foot (34 m) the patrol craft of the design first used in World War I carried the hull designator SC [submarine chaser] .

Though they carried machine guns and anti-aircraft guns, the weapon of choice was the depth charge. Larger 173-foot (53 m) sub chasers used the PC hull classification symbol (for Patrol, Coastal).

By the end of World War II, submarine chasers had sunk around 67 German U-boats. In the Pacific Theatre, submarine chasers were used for amphibious landings, courier and escort duty. 

In World War II, the United States Coast Guard utilized the SC for destroying German U-boats trying to sink merchant convoys. They would wait off the coast of the U

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HISTORY OF BRITISH ADMIRALTY
[NAVY]

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Board of admiralty app 1810. The same board room in use today

FROM THE INVENTION OF FIRST USABLE SHIPS CHRONOMETER AND DECK WATCH, TO THE FIELD WATCH, TO WWI WHEN THE WRIST WATCH [TRENCH WATCH] BECAME A WAR TOOL, THE INDIVIDUAL DEPARTMENTS OF THE BRITISH ARMED FORCES PROVIDED THEIR OWN SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS FOR WATCHES, TIMERS AND CHRONOGRAPHS; THOSE ACCEPTED WERE ASSIGNED  A "PATTERN" NUMBER.

THE ADMIRALTY WOULD REMAIN THE NATIONS PREMIER MILITARY AND POLITICAL FORCE  UNTIL THE AGE OF AIRCRAFT AT THE END OF WWII

At the beginning of the 20th century, the idea of submarine warfare was considered by senior personnel in the Admiralty to be "Underhand, unfair and damned un-English".

In fact it was stated by some that Submariners caught in action should be treated as pirates and executed.

How ever, with 30 years experience, the   renown of the USN was unstoppable. With this fact  in mind, the Royal Navy launched its first submarine, and, coincidental or not, named her  the" Holland 1", in 1901

I remain amazed the name is similar top the first USN Commissioned Sub the" HOLLAND"..

In WWI the Submarine would prove its worth. Five of the Royal Navy's 14 total Victoria Crosses of the war went to members of the Submarine corp.

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HOW THE PATTERN  #6 BECAME ONE OF A FEW 6 SECOND TIMERS
[ONLY A FEW COMPANIES PRODUCED A 6 SEC YARDAGE TIMER]

IN 1941, WALTHAM BUILT THE 1ST # 6 SEC YARDAGE TIMER FOR THE BRITS BEFORE THE USA JOINED THE WAR. IT WAS CONSTRUCTED TO EXACT BRITISH SPECIFICATIONS, ALONG WITH A REQUIREMENT THAT THE DESIGN BE CAPABLE OF WITHSTANDING SEVERE WEATHER AND FORCES, AND ABLE TO TIME 6 SECONDS PER REVOLUTION OVER AND OVER. THE RESULTING WALTHAM 6 SECOND TIMER WOULD HAVE IT'S CASE MACHINED WITH THE  ADMIRALTY PATTERN NO. 6., BROADARROW AND OPERATION CODE AS WELL HAS THE ADMIRALTY AND PATTERN NUMBER ON THE DIAL.  THIS  6 SECOND ANTI-SUB TIMER WAS THEN WAS ISSUED TO BRITISH CREWS.

BY 1943 WALTHAM EXPANDED PRODUCTION AND THE US WOULD ISSUE THESE TIMERS --WHICH ARE THE BEST-- TO THEIR ANTI-SUB CREWS.  IN FACT, WHILE THE "JITTERBUG" 10SEC NAVIGATION TIMER HAD US   AIRFORCE INFORMATION AND   A-8 DESIGNATION, THE SUBMARINE / SUB-CHASER 6 SECOND YARDAGE TIMER WAS NOT EVER USA DESIGNATED. NO NUMBER OR INFORMATION WAS PLACED ON THE CASES LIKE THE A-8 10 SEC NAVIGATION TIMER OR THE A-11 PILOTS HACKING NAVIGATION WRIST WATCH. AND IN FACT, IT HAD THE BRITISH ADMIRALTY PATTERN 6 ON THE DIALS.

SO, THE A-8 NAVIGATION TIMER UTILIZED BY BOTH BRITISH AND AMERICAN AIR CREWS WERE ISSUED WITH USA A-8 MILITARY MARKINGS, INCLUDING THOSE SUPPLIED TO THE   BRITISH AIR MINISTRY. WE DISCOVER SOME WITH BRITISH STAMPS, BUT MOST WERE DELIVERED TO THE FIELD WITH EXISTING USA MILITARY MARKINGS-  WITHOUT A BRITISH PATTERN NUMBER. BOTH US AND BRITISH AIR BOMBER CREWS BASED IN ENGLAND HAD THE   A-8 MILITARY ISSUE WITH ONLY THE US MILITARY ORDER INFO ON CASE BACK. OVER 25,000 US AIR CREW MEMBERS HAD THE BRITISH VERSION.. AT THE SAME TIME THE PATTERN #6 ANTI-SUB SUBMARINERS 6 SECOND TIMER WAS THE ONE WITH BRITISH MARKINGS.

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PATTERN NUMBERS

IN 1938, WITH WAR BEATING ON THE DOOR, THE BRITISH, WHO NORMALLY WOULD HAVE REQUIRED TESTING AND ASSIGNED PATTERN NO'S TO EVERY WATCH AND TIMER, SIMPLY PROVIDED THE BASIC REQUIREMENTS AND THOUSANDS OF WRIST WATCHES, TIMERS AND POCKET WATCHES WERE THEN STAMPED OR ENGRAVED AFTER DELIVERY OR AT THE FACTORY BEFORE DELIVERY. 

FOR MANY WATCHES, AN ABBREVIATION OF THE WORDS " GOVERNMENT SERVICE TEMPORARY PATTERN" --GTSP G.T.S.P. GS/TP -- WAS USED INSTEAD OF PATTERN OR USAGE ID. YET THE AGE OLD WAYS OF SOME SERVICES, MAINLY THE OLDEST, THE ADMIRALTY, AND THE NEWEST, THE AIR MINISTRY, CHOSE TO CONTINUE THE TRADITION ON MANY OF THEIR PURCHASES. THUS, SOME KEY TIMERS AND CHRONOGRAPHS WERE ASSIGNED A  PATTERN NO. AT THE FACTORY ALONG WITH A FACTORY SIGNED DIAL  [ "ADMIRALTY PATTERN NO 6" ].

THUS THE PATTERN NUMBER  [PATT.6 ] AND SERVICE NUMBER [U9833] ALONG WITH THE BROADARROW AND DIAL INFO, WAS PLACED AT THE FACTORY. AFTER THE USA JOINED THE BATTLE, SOME OF THESE PATTERN NUMBER TIME PIECES, LIKE THE  #6 ANTI-SUB TIMER, SOME WERE ISSUED TO US FORCES WITH BRITISH DETAILS.

WWII PATTER6 6SEC ANTI SUB

The first British WWII Contract For a *Pattern No 6, *6 second Anti Sub Naval Timer, was made with Waltham in 1941. By 1943, the " Admiralty Pattern NO 6 " had proved it's abilities.This unique 6 second yardage timer was utilized in ANTI-SUB Warfare on both *Submarines and Sub Chasers; for both military offensive & defensive systems.

*IN THE US AND GB.

The 6 sec ANTI-SUB is the rarest and most collectible of all WWII standard timers. In fact more than even the 10 sec Jitterbug AVIATION Timer by Elgin. Though  the pattern 6 second timer was issued to British and American Anti Submarine and Submarine Chaser Personal as well as US Coast Guard Anti-Sub Units throughout the theaters of operation during WWII,   they remain rare- especially those that saw ACTIVE SERVICE!

HOW THE 6 SEC TIMER WAS UTILIZED

Every revolution of this timer equals 6 seconds/5000 yards, the A-8 was 10 seconds, so this timer is faster yet as accurate as the vaunted A-8.  Why 6 seconds?    The rapid 6 second per revolution has to do with underwater sound. Under water sound travels at approx 1450 to 1500 m/s or (1586 to 1640 yards/s). Aping reflecting from a target at 1600 yards would return in approx 2 seconds. It is stated this 6 seconds per revolution utilized  by asdic/sonar operators on sub-chasers, cruisers and destroyers to find subs and on subs to find prey, and evade destroyers


United Kingdom
Naval Service
of the
British Armed Forces

BRITISH & THE SUB CHASERS DESTROYER

In early 1915, the British Admiralty selected the US Elco company for the production of 550 Motor Launches 80 feet (24 m) in length and capable of 20 knots (37 km/h),  armed with a 3-pounder gun, towed paravanes and later, depth charges, for anti-submarine work. The order was completed by November 1916, and the vessels entered Royal Navy service.

BRITISH PATTERNS Vs GSTP, IN 1938, WITH WAR BEATING ON THE DOOR, THE BRITISH, WHO NORMALLY WOULD HAVE REQUIRED TESTING AND ASSIGNED PATTERNS TO THE DIFFERENT WATCHES, SIMPLY MADE A CALL ON WATCH MANUFACTURERS AND PROVIDED BASIC REQUIREMENTS AND THEN STAMPED THE THOUSANDS OF TIMERS AND POCKET WATCHES WITH AN ABBREVIATION OF THE WORDS,    GOVERNMENT SERVICE TEMPORARY PATTERN: GTSP G.T.S.P. GT/SP

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GSTP / BROADARROW

BROAD ARROW

A broad arrow or pheon is a type of arrow with a typically flat barbed head. It is a symbol used traditionally in heraldry, most notably in England, and later the United Kingdom to mark government property.

The Office of Ordnance was created by Henry VIII in 1544. It dates back to the position of Master of Ordnance, one of whom, Nicholas Merbury, was present at the Battle of Agincourt. The Office became the Board of Ordnance in 1597, its principal duties being to supply guns, ammunition, stores and equipment to the King's Navy. The headquarters and main arsenal of the Office were in the White Tower of the Tower of London. The broad arrow mark has been used over the years by the Office and Board to signify at first objects purchased from the monarch's money and later to indicate government property. With the demise of the Board in 1855, the War Department and today's Ministry of Defense continued to use the mark. The arrow also appears in the Ordnance Survey logo.

The broad arrow frequently appeared on military boxes and equipment such as canteens, bayonets and rifles, as well as the British prison uniform from the 1870s, and even earlier, that of transportees in British penal colonies such as Australia The broad arrow marks were also used by Commonwealth countries on their ordnance.

The broad arrow was used by the British to mark trees intended for ship building use in North America during colonial times. Three axe strikes resembling an arrowhead and shaft, were marked on large mast-grade trees.

It is currently a criminal offence in the United Kingdom to reproduce the broad arrow without authority